Royal Regalia

This page describes and displays photos of past and current items of the regalia of Lochac.

Crowns and Coronets

Kingdom Crowns

When Lochac was approved to ascend to Kingdom level, a competition was held to design new royal crowns for the King and Queen. The competition was judged by one representative from each of the peerages, the keeper of the regalia and the reigning Prince and Princess.

Kings Crown of Lochac, photo by Lochac Regalia.

Kings Crown of Lochac, photo by Lochac Regalia.

Queens Crown of Lochac, photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

Queens Crown of Lochac, photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

Three entries were submitted, one each by Loyola Juan Sanchez Mendoza, Mistress Rowan Perigrynne, and Mistress Francesca Cellini. Mistress Rowan’s design won and were created by a professional jeweller in Queensland, Australia. In their creation, the spare pieces that were used as spacers to make the Principality coronets larger were melted down and incorporated to continue on the royal line.

Travel Crowns

Lochac also utilises travel Crowns. They are lighter and easier to transport than the official Crowns, and are often preferentially used as the primary Crowns for Reigns styled in an earlier period. In the past, a leather strip has been added behind the cut-outs to create a coloured effect with blue denoting the King and red denoting the Queen.

Queens travel crown, photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

Queens travel crown, photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

Principality Coronets

The Principality coronets were created by Anna Margot of the Barony of River Haven, made of silver. They were originally used for the Prince and Princess of the Principality of Lochac, however, they are still in use as regalia for the Crown Prince and Princess of the Kingdom of Lochac.

Princes coronet of Lochac, photo by Lochac Regalia.

Princes coronet of Lochac, photo by Lochac Regalia.

Princesses coronet of Lochac, photo by Lochac Regalia.

Princesses coronet of Lochac, photo by Lochac Regalia.

Crown Principality Circlets

The Crown Principality circlets were used to denote the Viceroys and Vicereines of the Crown Principality of Lochac, made by Master Guilliame Arnaut. They consisted of a straight band with gems adorning them.

The Viceroy and Vicereine circlets, as worn by Reynardine de Clifford and Marguerité de Rada y Silva at the Viceregal Tournament in River Haven 1986. Photo by Mistress Francesca Cellini.

The Viceroy and Vicereine circlets, as worn by Reynardine de Clifford and Marguerité de Rada y Silva at the Viceregal Tournament in River Haven 1986. Photo by Mistress Francesca Cellini.

Crown of Cumberland

The Crown of Cumberland was made by Lady Robyn Breheny (now Mistress Rowan Perigrynne) to denote the King of Cumberland. It was made from fur-lined brass and included fleur-de-lis in the design.

Crown of Cumberland, made by Mistress Rowan Perigrynne, photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

Crown of Cumberland, made by Mistress Rowan Perigrynne, photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

Fealty Chains

The Royal fealty chains are traditionally worn by the King and Queen of Lochac until they find their heirs – the victors of the Crown Tournament held within Their reign. The Crown passes the fealty chains to the Crown Prince and Princess of Lochac.

One of Lochac’s fealty chains gifted by the West Kingdom, photo by Lochac Regalia.

One of Lochac’s fealty chains gifted by the West Kingdom, photo by Lochac Regalia.

The original tokens depicting the Arms of Lochac that hang on the fealty chains were gifted to Lochac by the Kingdom of the West. They originated from the West Kingdom fealty chains, which included each and every Principality under West rule upon it.

Signet Rings

The Crowns of Lochac each wear a silver Lochac signet ring.

King of Lochac’s fealty ring, photo by Lochac Regalia.

King of Lochac’s fealty ring, photo by Lochac Regalia.

Queen of Lochac’s fealty ring, photo by Lochac Regalia.

Queen of Lochac’s fealty ring, photo by Lochac Regalia.

Sword of State

Fealty for Crowns and Baronages are sworn on the Sword of State – fealty of Knights may be sworn on the Sword of State or a sword of their choosing. The sword is usually kept by the Kingdom Earl Marshal and provided to the Crown for courts as required.

Lochac has used three different swords of state throughout it’s history.

Sword the Bastard holding Lochac's first Sword of State at Rowany Festival 2002. Photo by John of the Hills, 2002.

Sean the Bastard holding Lochac’s first Sword of State at Rowany Festival 2002. Photo by John of the Hills, 2002.

The second Sword of State was made by Owen von dem Noorden from Saint-Florian-de-la-rivière and presented to Prince Alfar of Attica on 14 November 1998 (AS 33) at Coronet Tournament hosted by the Barony of Innilgard. Unfortunately, this piece of regalia was stolen whilst in the back of a car and had to be replaced.

Lochac's second Sword of State, made by Owen von dem Noorden. Photo by Owen von dem Noorden.

Lochac’s second Sword of State, made by Owen von dem Noorden. Photo by Owen von dem Noorden.

The current Sword of State is Lochac’s third incarnation of this piece of regalia. The belt attached to the sword was made by Count Bran na torcdubh mac Brude. The engravings on the belt tell the story of the first Crown of Lochac.

Lochac’s third and current Sword of State, photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

Lochac’s third and current Sword of State, photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

Great Seal of Lochac

The Great Seal of Lochac is the property of the Crown entrusted to the Crux Australis Herald, however, it usually resides with the College of Scribes as they constantly use it in their work.

Lochac's Great Seal of State, as stamped into red wax. Photo by Lochac's College of Scribes.

Lochac’s Great Seal of State, as stamped into red wax. Photo by Lochac’s College of Scribes.

The seal itself is made of metal and was created by Master William Bjornsson of the Kingdom of An Tir. It was comissioned by Duquessa Juana Isabella de Montoya y Ramirez and donated to Lochac on behalf of the West Kingdom College of Scribes on the occasion of Lochac becoming its own Kingdom.

Ceremonial Mantles

The Ceremonial Mantles of Lochac were designed by Master Bartolomeo Giancristoforo Agazzari and made by the Worshipful Company of Broiderers in time for the Coronation of the first King and Queen of Lochac. The design was based on two famous cloaks –The Mantle of Christ and the Syon Cope. More information about this project is available on The Royal Cloaks webpage of the Worshipful Company of Broiderers website.

Gudrun, first Queen of Lochac, wearing one of the Ceremonial Mantles of Lochac. Photo courtesy of the Worshipful Company of Broiderers.

Gudrun, first Queen of Lochac, wearing one of the Ceremonial Mantles of Lochac. Photo courtesy of the Worshipful Company of Broiderers.

Close up of the Queen’s Ceremonial Mantle of Lochac. Photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

Close up of the Queen’s Ceremonial Mantle of Lochac. Photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

The morses (clasps) used on the Ceremonial Mantles were a gift to the Kingdom for the first Coronation of Lochac, made by Mistress Diane de Winchester and Master Mark von dem Falkensfenn. Mistress Diane and Master Mark donated the labor of the silver setting as well as the labor of the enamels to Lochac in the making of these Morses.

One of the pair of Morses (cloak clasps) made and gifted to Lochac by Mistress Diane de Winchester and Master Mark von dem Falkensfenn. Photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

One of the pair of Morses (cloak clasps) made and gifted to Lochac by Mistress Diane de Winchester and Master Mark von dem Falkensfenn. Photo by TH Lady Ceara Shionnach.

Rods of State

King James and Queen Verena of the West Kingdom signed the Charter of Lochac in October 1984, at which time the Rods of State were presented to a representative of Lochac as a gift from the Kingdom of the West. The Rods of State were sceptres used during the Vicereigns that were made of table legs that had squared-off tops. The four side faces and the top face were each painted with the devices of each reign – all the Viceroys on one and all the Vicereines on the other.

The Viceroy and Vicereine circlets, as worn by Reynardine de Clifford and Marguerité de Rada y Silva at the Viceregal Tournament in River Haven 1986. Photo by Mistress Francesca Cellini.

The Rods of State, as held by Reynardine de Clifford and Marguerité de Rada y Silva at the Viceregal Tournament in River Haven 1986. Photo by Mistress Francesca Cellini.